Turkish names aren’t found only in motherlodes, like court records and city surveys; they’re also found in pockets, little nuggets of data hidden in articles about different topics entirely. When I come across a pocket, I try to record it here.

Male Zimmi Names

Name Notes Place and Time Source
Dursun “May he live,” a wish that the child will survive infancy. Also written “Tursun.” Used by Muslims as well as zimmi. Manisa 1531 Matthews, p. 80
Cu:ncor Manisa 1531 Matthews, p. 80
Gerzi Manisa 1531 Matthews, p. 80
Kasim Manisa 1531 Matthews, p. 80
Mihail Also used by Muslims. Manisa 1531 Matthews, p. 80
Toma Manisa 1531 Matthews, p. 80
Bazarlu Manisa 1572/1573 Matthews, p. 80
Gu:lyan Manisa 1572/1573 Matthews, p. 80
Karago:z “Black brows” or “black eyes.” Also used by Muslims. Manisa 1572/1573 Matthews, p. 80
Kasi.m Also used by Muslims. Manisa 1572/1573 Matthews, p. 80
Yorgi Greek, Georgios. Manisa 1572/1573 Matthews, p. 80
Yusuf Arabic form of Joseph. Used by Muslims, Jews, and Christians. Manisa 1572/1573 Matthews, p. 80
Murad Borne by a Greek. More commonly used by Muslims. Manisa 1621 Matthews, p. 77

Sources

Matthews: Matthews, Joyce Hedda. “Toward an Isolario of the Ottoman Inheritance Inventory.” Consumption Studies and the History of the Ottoman Empire, 1550-1922: An Introduction. Ed. Donald Quataert. Albany, N.Y. : State University of New York Press, c2000. Pp. 45-82?